« Who am I? | Main | Grip Drills »

May 09, 2008

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

caustic

Generally, a good description of how to hold the blade - too many times have I seen rowers (Even good ones) who choose to try to line up the knuckles with the oar handle, even though this is not a relaxed nor instinctual grip!.

However, one thing you seem to have glanced over is the release - in reality, it is definitely possible, and directly observable, to see the oar feather just slightly while still fully buried. The reason is because as the oar face turns in the water, less force is applied to keep it square (since both the rower cannot pull as hard with just the arms, and because the face of the blade is now at an angle to the direction of intended motion). As a result, since the hands are pulling the handle in while resting on the top of the hangle, a slight torque is now proportionately larger than before (due to reduced force of water keeping the blade square). End result, a slight tilt of the blade while still buried. Advantage? A smoother and cleaner release than a purely square "drop & go" finish.

caustic

Generally, a good description of how to hold the blade - too many times have I seen rowers (Even good ones) who choose to try to line up the knuckles with the oar handle, even though this is not a relaxed nor instinctual grip!.

However, one thing you seem to have glanced over is the release - in reality, it is definitely possible, and directly observable, to see the oar feather just slightly while still fully buried. The reason is because as the oar face turns in the water, less force is applied to keep it square (since both the rower cannot pull as hard with just the arms, and because the face of the blade is now at an angle to the direction of intended motion). As a result, since the hands are pulling the handle in while resting on the top of the hangle, a slight torque is now proportionately larger than before (due to reduced force of water keeping the blade square). End result, a slight tilt of the blade while still buried. Advantage? A smoother and cleaner release than a purely square "drop & go" finish.

Karen Chenausky

Caustic, you are absolutely right about glancing over the finish. It is the subject of an upcoming post. I like your explanation of how the blade tends to feather slightly underwater, though I think this is still a fairly complex issue. If it is all right with you, I may quote you in my post about the finish.

caustic

No need to quote me! Frank Cunningham was the first one to tell (and show) me that feather finish. All credit goes to him for that one. Once you see it happen, it's definitely an "ah ha!" moment for the finish.

Craig Nova

Karen:

First, I wanted to thank you for your comments and your advice, general and specific. Both are very helpful. Iit’s too bad we are stuck with words to suggest the intensity of the help you give, so let’s just say, Thanks.

But the last few days I have been playing around with a comment that is in a post of yours, that is someone catches with her butt. I have been doing all of this much more slowly, that is squaring up, slowing down the slide, then dropping in the blades, and (of course I now realize) sort of hanging at the catch.

So, I started trying to stop the wheels and catch with my rear end, if that makes any sense, and somehow, I guess because my hands are so light and shoulders so loose, the blades just go in and I am driving, with no check. The reason I know this is that I have a little Android app that gives speed, and the speed for 500 meters falls fifteen seconds even at light pressure by catching this way.

Well, all of this is sent to say thanks...Craig

The comments to this entry are closed.